Lethbridge College News

 

 

  1. Lethbridge College’s 10th Annual Blood Drive

    Lethbridge College is very proud to be a Partner for Life with Canadian Blood Services, and the start of November marks the beginning of our 10th annual Blood Drive. As a Partner for Life, Lethbridge College has committed to saving lives by donating blood as a team to help ensure that patients continue to get the blood they need. We are calling on students, staff and alumni to roll up their sleeves to save lives. 

    Make your donation count:

    To have your donations count towards the Lethbridge College blood drive, register online using Partner ID number LETH010182. By registering just once, each past and future donation will be automatically attributed to your Partners for Life group, helping Lethbridge College achieve its goal. 

    Book your appointment:

    To book an appointment to donate, download the GiveBlood app or visit blood.ca

    Did you know?

    • Every minute of every day someone in Canada needs blood to help save their life.
    • Each year 1,200 new donors are needed to meet anticipated patient need in Lethbridge alone.
    • Over half of all Canadians say they or a family member has needed blood or blood products.
  2. Blackfoot name Ohkotoki’aahkkoiyiiniimaan, or Stone Pipe, given to Lethbridge College at Indigenous Celebration Day

    Oct. 19, 2017 – Evoking the image of strength and straight paths, and celebrating promises made with honesty and integrity, Kainai Kaahsinnoonik (Grandparent) Peter Weasel Moccasin gave Lethbridge College a Blackfoot name this morning at a ceremony that kicked off the institution’s annual Indigenous Celebration Day.

    The name given to the college is Ohkotoki’aahkkoiyiiniimaan, which means Stone Pipe. As Elder Peter Weasel Moccasin explained during the ceremony, stone pipes are used in sacred ceremonies of the Blackfoot people to make an offering to Iihtsipaatapi’op, the Source of Life. The pipe, he said, kept and keeps the Blackfoot people at peace.

    Read the entire meaning behind the name Ohkotoki’aahkkoiyiiniimaan here.

    Weasel Moccasin described how that the offering of a stone pipe is a promise or a peace bond made with the honesty and integrity needed to fulfill the commitment. During the offering of the pipe, everyone involved must uphold and carry out the promises made.

    “We are so incredibly grateful to receive this name from our local Blackfoot community,” says Dr. Paula Burns, President and CEO of Lethbridge College. “We recognize the importance of Indigenous education and the vitally important perspectives that the local Indigenous community bring to the work that we do here every day. We will respect our name with a promise to continue on the straight path to improving the lives of our students and the communities that they call home.”

    The land where Lethbridge College sits is the traditional territory of the Blackfoot people and the giving of a Blackfoot name is an important step towards strengthening ties with the local Indigenous community.

    “Today is a very important day in the college’s history,” says Marcia Black Water, Lethbridge College Indigenous Services coordinator. “The Blackfoot name received today has great significance to the land Lethbridge College is situated on. The stone found for Blackfoot ceremonial pipes can be found in the coulees’ river bottom on the west side of the college. The name will see us through the future, a future in which Blackfoot people, all Indigenous people will be reminded that quality education is a promise our college will hold true. The name promises a coming together, good relations.”

    Shanda Webber, Lethbridge College manager of Recruitment and Indigenous Services, adds: “It truly is an honour for Lethbridge College to be receiving a Blackfoot name. The naming ceremony recognizes and celebrates the meaningful relationship between the college and the local Blackfoot community, as well as solidifies our commitment and responsibility in making Indigenous education a priority.”

    This fall, 374 Indigenous students are taking diploma, degree or certificate programs at Lethbridge College, representing 8.6 per cent of the college’s diploma, degree and certificate students. Lethbridge College’s efforts towards serving Indigenous students both in and out of the classroom earned it a bronze Indigenous Education Excellence award in May from Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan). The college has proudly had Indigenous students on campus for most of its 60 years and provides a “Circle of Services” to assist Indigenous learners.

    Indigenous Services at Lethbridge College, in collaboration with many internal and external stakeholders, developed a three-year Niitsitapi Indigenization Plan for 2016-19. In addition, in recognition of the recommendations emanating from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada and as a signatory of CICan’s Indigenous Education Protocol, the college has also implemented an Indigenous President’s Council. This council is composed of college and Indigenous community leaders and provides guidance and direction to an internal Indigenous committee as it works to implement a three-year Indigenization Plan, which will further enhance its already extensive program and service offerings.

     

  3. Kodiaks basketball tips off – women to defend national title; men set to host ACAC championships

    Oct. 18, 2017 – The defending CCAA national champion Lethbridge College Kodiaks women’s basketball team begins defense of its title this week as a new ACAC season tips off. Meanwhile, the Kodiaks men’s team has its own championship aspirations as the club will host the Cora Breakfast and Lunch ACAC Men’s Basketball Championships from March 1-3 in the Val Matteotti Gymnasium.

    The Kodiaks men’s team will host the ACAC championship tournament for the first time in program history. It is the second straight year that the ACAC championships have come to Lethbridge College, after hosting the women’s tournament last season.  

    In 2016-17, the Kodiaks men’s team finished the season 15-6, in third place in the ACAC south division. In the playoffs, they upset top-ranked Medicine Hat College before earning a conference silver medal. They went on to finish tied for fifth at the CCAA national championship tournament in Prince Edward Island.

    The team hopes to build off its accomplishments this season, led by returning ACAC all-star Cory Richardson (fourth year, Business Administration) who will guide the offense from the point, versatile Pierce Val Gaalen (fifth year, General Studies) who can play anywhere on the floor and power forward Keanu Funa (second year, Business Administration). While the team lost firepower with Chris Maughn and Robert Myles III moving on, recruits Cole Crick (fourth year, Business Administration), Mike Clemons (fourth year, Exercise Science) and Daniel Lybbert (second year, General Studies) bring previous post-secondary experience to help bolster a team that returns most of the rest of its core.

    “We've made the playoffs in each of my six seasons here as head coach, however southern Alberta fans have never seen an ACAC men's playoff game in Lethbridge during that time,” says Kodiaks men’s basketball head coach Ryan Heggie. “We are excited to host and we feel that when March comes, our team will be ready to make another run at a banner. Our ACAC south division plays a very good brand of ball and it is very tough to win on any given night, but we’re ready to go.”

    The Kodiaks women’s team put together one of the greatest seasons in Canadian college basketball history in 2016-17, going a perfect 37-0, winning both the ACAC and CCAA championships. But, it was an off-season of turnover for the club, as long-time head coach Brad Karren retired and three of the top players in the country – ACAC MVP Logan Moncks; CCAA tournament MVP Sunder West; and four-time ACAC first team all-star Emma Lowry – all finished their ACAC careers.

    Former Kodiaks all-star and long-time assistant coach Deanna Dotts replaces Karren as head coach. While on the court, the team will lean heavily on returnees Amy Arbon (fifth year, General Studies), Jaclyn Heggie (fourth year, General Studies) and Shayna Mathison (third year, Interior Design Technology) to help fill holes, while bringing in a strong group of recruits to help build for the future.

    “Coming off a national championship season, and losing six of our top nine players, we are looking to rebuild and redefine who we are as a team,” says Deanna Dotts, Kodiaks women’s basketball coach. “We have a balanced core, with a talented incoming class who will all need to step into new roles when the season begins. This group will be fundamentally sound and will have the growth potential to work our way to the playoffs.”

    The Kodiaks basketball season preview is available here

    The Kodiaks open the season with home games against Briercrest College on Friday, as the women tip off at 6 p.m., followed by the women at 8 p.m. at the Val Matteotti Gymnasium. Tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for seniors, youth and alumni, $3 for college employees and free for students. The Kodiaks then travel to Medicine Hat College for games on Saturday evening. 

  4. Kodiaks Hall of Fame to honour 12 during inaugural induction

    Oct. 18, 2017 – As part of its 60th anniversary celebrations, Lethbridge College is celebrating its decorated athletic history with the creation of the Kodiaks Hall of Fame. The inaugural class of 12 inductees will be recognized during ceremonies at the Kodiaks basketball and volleyball games this weekend.

    The class of 2017 will honour four outstanding athletes, three foundational coaches and five championship teams from throughout the college’s history. This year’s inductees include:

    Athletes

    ·         Sharon (Davies) Fogtmann - women’s badminton
    ·         Laurie Ann Hockridge – women’s basketball
    ·         Kip Kangogo – men’s cross country running
    ·         Sai Wong – men’s volleyball

    Coaches

    ·         John Jasiukiewicz – women’s basketball
    ·         Alvin Tietz – women’s soccer
    ·         Tim Tollestrup – men’s basketball

    Teams

    ·         1988-89 and 1989-90 women’s basketball
    ·         1988-89 men’s basketball
    ·         1993-94 women’s soccer
    ·         2002-03 women’s cross country running
    ·         2004-05 and 2005-06 cross country running

    “I would like to thank Lethbridge College for this honour and wish to congratulate all the inductees,” says Sharon (Davies) Fogtmann, who won the CCAA women’s badminton championship in 1979. “I was very proud to represent Lethbridge College in the CCAA badminton championships in Montreal. The support of Lethbridge College was an integral part of my success in the sport and one of my fellow inductees, Tim Tollestrup, was a huge supporter of badminton during his tenure as athletic director.”

    The Kodiaks Hall of Fame is an initiative of the Kodiak Athletic Association, a group of boosters committed to preserving and celebrating the college’s athletic history, while finding opportunities to support current and future Kodiaks student-athletes. Plaques of the inductees will be permanently placed on display in the mezzanine area of the Val Matteotti Gymnasium.

    “We have such a rich history of Kodiaks athletics, dating back to our very first year as a college in 1957, and we want to celebrate that,” says Todd Caughlin, manager of Kodiaks Athletics. “We have earned 57 ACAC championships, 12 CCAA championships and had 49 Kodiaks named CCAA Academic All-Canadians, so we will have no shortage of worthy nominees in the years to come, and we believe this first class represents a great start to what will become a tremendous Kodiaks tradition.”

    Inductees will be honoured during halftime of the Kodiaks women’s and men’s basketball games on Friday, as well as between sets three and four of the Kodiaks volleyball teams on Saturday. The women’s games begin at 6 p.m. each night, with the men’s games following at 8 p.m., in the Val Matteotti Gymnasium. Ceremony times for the inductees are as follows:

    ·         Women’s basketball (Friday): ’88-’90 women’s basketball, Jasiukiewicz, Hockridge

    ·         Men’s basketball (Friday): ’88-’89 men’s basketball, Tollestrup, Fogtmann

    ·         Women’s volleyball (Saturday): ’93-’94 women’s soccer, Tietz, ’02-’03 women’s XC

    ·         Men’s volleyball (Saturday): ’04-’06 men’s XC, Kangogo, Wong

    Full inductee biographies are available online

  5. Lethbridge College to receive Blackfoot name at Indigenous Celebration Day

    Oct. 18, 2017 – Located on traditional Blackfoot territory, Lethbridge College is proud to showcase its Indigenous students, employees and community members during Indigenous Celebration Day on Thursday. As part of this year’s festivities, the college will be granted a Blackfoot name, an important step towards strengthening ties with the local Indigenous community.

    The annual celebration will also feature traditional entertainment, displays and food, celebrating all of the region’s Indigenous cultures.

    “We have so much knowledge, talent, expertise and leadership among our local Indigenous population and this is our chance to really celebrate that,” says Shanda Webber, manager of Recruitment and Indigenous Services. “Indigenous Celebration Day is about celebrating our pride, history and knowledge of all First Nations, Métis and Inuit peoples, as well as creating a welcoming, inclusive learning environment for all. We invite everyone to join us for this annual celebration.”

    Indigenous Celebration Day begins at 10 a.m. on Thursday, with a grand entry and opening ceremonies, followed by the Blackfoot naming ceremony at 10:30 a.m. Entertainment will then take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., including powwow drumming and dancing, hoop dancing, Métis fiddling and jigging, and a hand drum contest. The afternoon will also feature performances from Lethbridge College alumnus and Juno nominee Armond Duck Chief (Business Administration – Management 2015), Will Big Bull and Soul Sisters.

    A traditional feast of Buffalo stew and bannock will be available from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

    The entire event is free to attend and is open to anyone from both the college and the community at large. All festivities will take place in the Val Matteotti Gymnasium.

    This fall, 374 Indigenous students are taking diploma, degree or certificate programs at Lethbridge College, representing 8.6 per cent of the college’s diploma, degree and certificate students. Lethbridge College’s efforts towards serving Indigenous students both in and out of the classroom earned it a bronze Indigenous Education Excellence award in May from Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan). The college has proudly had Indigenous students on campus for most of its 60 years and provides a “Circle of Services” to assist Indigenous learners.

    Indigenous Services at Lethbridge College, in collaboration with many internal and external stakeholders, developed a three-year Niitsitapi Indigenization Plan for 2016-19. In addition, in recognition of the recommendations emanating from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada and as a signatory of CICan’s Indigenous Education Protocol, the college has also implemented an Indigenous President’s Council. This council is composed of college and Indigenous community leaders and provides guidance and direction to an internal Indigenous committee as it works to implement a three-year Indigenization Plan, which will further enhance its already extensive program and service offerings.